Screen Printing used equipment

March 23, 2020
Ex Demo Roland TrueVIS VG-640

Information about frame type. Ryonet provides high quality aluminum pre-stretched screens in various sizes and mesh counts. All aluminum frames are extruded with the highest grade aluminum and cut and welded right here in the USA. Once welded, the frames are then sandblasted to insure mesh bonds properly to the aluminum and retain its tension through thousands of imprints. Screens are stretched pneumatically to industry standard tensions using high grade mono filament poly mesh and held using cyanoacrylate glue.

More about aluminum frames. The advantage of an aluminum screen printing frame is the durability and longevity it retains. Unlike wood silk screen printing frames, when exposing frames to water in a dip tank or washout sink aluminum frames will not warp. This will insure a flat frame through thousands of prints to come. Aluminum frames can also be stretched and re-stretched many times. The mesh and glue are simply removed from the frame using a professional tool that doesn’t damage the aluminum. Once cleaned, the frames can then be re-stretched which will give you the ability to use that frame for years of hard work in your shop. Aluminum frames are also light weight which makes shipping less expensive and saves you money in the long run. If you're looking to maximize performance in your shop, aluminum frames are a great item to add to your screen printing equipment.

More about screen printing mesh size: Different mesh sizes are used for different applications in the screen printing process. Mesh size is measured by how many threads of mesh there are crossing per square inch. For instance, a 110 mesh screen has 110 threads crossing per square inch. The higher the mesh count, the finer the threads and holes are in the screen. The size of the mesh has a lot to do with how detailed your image is and how thick the ink you are using is. If you have an image with extremely high detail, a lower mesh screen won’t hold the high detail. The fine lines or dots in the image will simply fall through the holes in the mesh not giving you a correct representation of what your image should be. Also if you are using a thinner ink, the ink will also flood through the larger holes and soak onto your shirt or substrate making your image blurry as the ink bleeds. On the other hand, if you are trying to print a thicker ink (such as white) through to high of a mesh screen, barely any ink will print through the mesh. You will notice that different companies have different sizes available. If the mesh count is fairly close, such as the difference between 155 vs. 156, 196 vs. 200, or 81 vs. 86, the difference is so negligible and small that it will not matter in your final results. Since there are many variables involved in silk screen printing we can’t tell you exactly what mesh sizes are used for what applications. However we can give you a general outline of what sizes to use for certain types of printing.

Source: www.screenprinting.com
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